something lovely,funny,entertaining etc

 

Hi everybody you know sometimes perhaps in an e-mail or something you get some lovely things that I am sure some of us would love to share or perhaps a joke

BUT

They must be polite and not rude or anything that would offend anybody nor can they be racial

and please no chain letters.........

We don't need to see Violence or stupidy......

 

Remember people over the many MIchael Bolton boards we have always tried to respect one and another so lets see how this goes :)

 

These are some of the picture's sent to me in an e-mail

enjoy  :)

 

Cherry Blossoms Japan 

 

Tundra

 

 

Autumn in Germany

 

The beauty of Antarctica

 

 

 

Views: 3105

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Or something like this what a shot !!!!!

Thanks Juliet they are beautiful even the shark one!

Love Dianna xxx
These pictures are incredible!!! Beautiful!!!

Love Eileen xoxo

Hello Dianna,

I definitely prefer this golf player !!!

Ivana :-))

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9qrAKYP_Ak

 

Me too!!!! lol

Kathy and LAFD Bob

Hello Dianna, I try this afternoon to share some pictures Iike a lot for us, in the site of Michael and i hope you like these too, all the members and You, Michael Thank's Dianna and Juliett Bye BD
Hey Dianna, great idea! I have tons of great forwards and I hope you guys enjoy them. This is one of my favorite ones. Take care. Hugs, sincerely, Sylvie from Canada
The daffodil principle
Several times my daughter had telephoned to say,
"Mother, you must come to see the daffodils before they are over."
I wanted to go, but it was a two-hour drive from Laguna to Lake Arrowhead
"I will come next Tuesday", I promised a little reluctantly on her third call.
Next Tuesday dawned cold and rainy. Still, I had promised, and reluctantly
I drove there. When I finally walked into Carolyn's house I was welcomed by
the joyful sounds of happy children. I delightedly hugged and greeted my
grandchildren. "Forget the daffodils, Carolyn! The road is invisible in these clouds and fog,
and there is nothing in the world except you and these children that I want
to see badly enough to drive another inch!"
My daughter smiled calmly and said, "We drive in this all the time, Mother."
"Well, you won't get me back on the road until it clears, and then I'm heading for home!" I assured her. "But first we're going to see the daffodils. It's just a few blocks," Carolyn said.
"I'll drive. I'm used to this."
"Carolyn," I said sternly, "Please turn around."
"It's all right, Mother, I promise. You will never forgive yourself if you miss this experience."
After about twenty minutes, we turned onto a small gravel road and I saw a small church. On the far side of the church, I saw a hand lettered sign with an arrow that read, "Daffodil Garden." We got out of the car, each took a child's hand, and I followed Carolyn down the path Then, as we turned a corner, I looked up and gasped. Before me lay the most glorious sight.
It looked as though someone had taken a great vat of gold and poured it over
the mountain peak and its surrounding slopes. The flowers were planted in
majestic, swirling patterns, great ribbons and swaths of deep orange, creamy
white, lemon yellow, salmon pink, and saffron and butter yellow. Each different colored variety was planted in large groups so that it swirled and flowed like its own river with its own unique hue. There were five acres of flowers.
"Who did this?" I asked Carolyn. "Just one woman," Carolyn answered. "She lives on the property. That's her home." Carolyn pointed to a well-kept A-frame house, small and modestly sitting in the midst of all that glory. We walked up to the house.
On the patio, we saw a poster. "Answers to the Questions I Know You Are Asking", was the headline. The first answer was a simple one. "50,000 bulbs," it read. The second answer was, "One at a time, by one woman. Two hands, two feet, and one brain." The third answer was, "Began in 1958."
For me, that moment was a life-changing experience. I thought of this woman whom I had never met, who, more than forty years before, had begun, one bulb at a time, to bring her vision of beauty and joy to an obscure mountaintop. Planting one bulb at a time, year after year, this unknown woman had forever changed the world in which she lived. One day at a time, she had created something of extraordinary magnificence, beauty, and inspiration. The principle her daffodil garden taught is one of the greatest principles of celebration.
That is, learning to move toward our goals and desires one step at a time--often just one baby-step at a time--and learning to love the doing, learning to use the accumulation of time. When we multiply tiny pieces of time with small increments of daily effort, we too will find we can accomplish magnificent things. We can change the world .
"It makes me sad in a way," I admitted to Carolyn. "What might I have accomplished if I had thought of a wonderful goal thirty-five or forty years ago and had worked away at it 'one bulb at a time' through all those years? Just think what I might have been able to achieve!"
My daughter summed up the message of the day in her usual direct way. "Start tomorrow," she said.
She was right. It's so pointless to think of the lost hours of yesterdays. The way to make learning a lesson of celebration instead of a cause for regret is to only ask, "How can I put this to use today?"
Use the Daffodil Principle. Stop waiting....
Until your car or home is paid off, Until you get a new car or home, Until your kids leave the house, Until you go back to school, Until you finish school, Until you clean the house, Until you organize the garage, Until you clean off your desk, Until you lose 10 lbs., Until you gain 10 lbs., Until you get married, Until you get a divorce, Until you have kids, Until the kids go to school, Until you retire, Until summer, Until spring, Until winter, Until fall, Until you die...
There is no better time than right now to be happy.
Happiness is a journey, not a destination.
So work like you don't need money.
Love like you've never been hurt, and, dance like no one's watching.
If you want to brighten someone's day, pass this on to someone special. I just did!
Wishing you a beautiful, daffodil day!
Don't be afraid that your life will end, be afraid that it will never begin.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFM36LIEEy0
Sylvie that is inspiring and beautiful
Love Dianna xxx
Sylvie, That was absolutely beautiful and inspiring story !!!! Thank so much for sharing it!!!!!

Love Eileen xoxo

And Dianna what a wonderful Idea you had!!
Thanks Silvie,
For all your words of inspiration,
There is no better time, than now, to be happy!

KB
Hi Dianna, glad you liked it sweetie! As I've said, I have a ton of them and I'll share my best ones with everyone. Today's message is "thanks for your time". Take care. Hugs, sincerely, Sylvie from Canada
A young man learns what's most important in life from the guy next door.
It had been some time since Jack had seen the old man. College, girls, career, and life itself got in the way. In fact, Jack moved clear across the country in pursuit of his dreams. There, in the rush of his busy life, Jack had little time to think about the past and often no time to spend with his wife and son. He was working on his future, and nothing could stop him. Over the phone, his mother told him, "Mr. Belser died last night. The funeral is Wednesday." Memories flashed through his mind like an old newsreel as he sat quietly remembering his childhood days.
"Jack, did you hear me?" "Oh, sorry, Mom. Yes, I heard you. It's been so long since I thought of him. I'm sorry, but I honestly thought he died years ago," Jack said. "Well, he didn't forget you. Every time I saw him he'd ask how you were doing. He'd reminisce about the many days you spent over 'his side of the fence' as he put it," Mom told him.
"I loved that old house he lived in," Jack said.
"You know, Jack, after your father died, Mr. Belser stepped in to make sure you had a man's influence in your life," she said
"He's the one who taught me carpentry," he said. "I wouldn't be in this business if it weren't for him. He spent a lot of time teaching me things he thought were important...Mom, I'll be there for the funeral," Jack said. As busy as he was, he kept his word. Jack caught the next flight to his hometown. Mr. Belser's funeral was small and uneventful. He had no children of his own, and most of his relatives had passed away. The night before he had to return home, Jack and his Mom stopped by to see the old house next door one more time.
Standing in the doorway, Jack paused for a moment. It was like crossing over into another dimension, a leap through space and time The house was exactly as he remembered. Every step held memories. Every picture, every piece of furniture....Jack stopped suddenly.
"What's wrong, Jack?" his Mom asked.
"The box is gone," he said "What box?" Mom asked.
"There was a small gold box that he kept locked on top of his desk. I must have asked him a thousand times what was inside. All he'd ever tell me was 'the thing I value most,'" Jack said.
It was gone. Everything about the house was exactly how Jack remembered it, except for the box. He figured someone from the Belser family had taken it. "Now I'll never know what was so valuable to him," Jack said. "I better get some sleep. I have an early flight home, Mom."
It had been about two weeks since Mr. Belser died Returning home from work one day Jack discovered a note in his mailbox. "Signature required on a package. No one at home. Please stop by the main post office within the next three days," the note read.
Early the next day Jack retrieved the package. The small box was old and looked like it had been mailed a hundred years ago. The handwriting was difficult to read, but the return address caught his attention. "Mr. Harold Belser" it read. Jack took the box out to his car and ripped open the package. There inside was the gold box and an envelope. Jack's hands shook as he read the note inside. "Upon my death, please forward this box and its contents to Jack Bennett. It's the thing I valued most in my life." A small key was taped to the letter.
His heart racing, as tears filling his eyes, Jack carefully unlocked the box. There inside he found a beautiful gold pocket watch.
Running his fingers slowly over the finely etched casing, he unlatched the cover. Inside he found these words engraved:
"Jack, Thanks for your time! -Harold Belser."
"The thing he valued most was...my time"
Jack held the watch for a few minutes, then called his office and cleared his appointments for the next two days. "Why?" Janet, his assistant asked. "I need some time to spend with my son," he said.
"Oh, by the way, Janet, thanks for your time!"
"Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take but by the moments that take our breath away,"
Hi Sylvie, Wow Another wonderful story! Juliet, thats one of my favorite books along with - 7 People You Meet in Heaven--They are wonderful books!!!!!


Love Eileen xoxo

RSS

© 2014   Created by Michael Bolton Admin.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service